Archive | 1992 UK No.1 Singles RSS feed for this section

Whitney Houston – ‘I Will Always Love You’ (Song 12 of 12)

1 Nov

One point for spending ten weeks at the top, meaning I had to listen to less bad music, and a second point for all simpletons fucking it up on prime-time talent shows, which is funny.
2/5

Charles And Eddie – ‘Would I Lie To You?’ (Song 11 of 12)

1 Nov

The group name and song title conjoured up images of short cockneys in the East End, enjoying a knees-up round a dirty old piano, money troubles and dirt be damned. I wasn’t expecting a pop-soul hit with underwhelming verses and a sound dated even by early 90s’ standards.

Their debut album was called ‘Duophonic’, just incase their name was too subtle in revealing that this group did in fact have two members.
1/5

Boyz II Men – ‘End Of The Road’ (Song 10 of 12)

1 Nov

Believe it or not, these guys are one of the top-selling R&B acts of all time, though don’t get that confused with rhythm & blues; I don’t recall Fats Domino or Little Richard composing mellow lullabies about crying over a woman. They certainly wouldn’t have interupted a composition with an ill-advised spoken-word piece at 3:34. The choruses are ok when all the lads sing together (and the acapella fade-out is commendable), but individually, they left a lot to be desired.
2/5

Tasmin Archer ‘Sleeping Satellite’ (Song 9 of 12)

1 Nov

There is no escpaing the fact that Tasmin was a stellar rhymer, however you only need to listen to the first fifteen seconds of this long-forgotten hit and then discard it without looking back.
1/5

The Shamen – ‘Ebeneezer Goode’ (Song 8 of 12)

1 Nov

The cornerstone of every grotty warehouse rave in 1992, this monster hit was actually highly controversial due to the constant utterance of ‘Es are good’ throughout the entire thing. It’s a song that’s unashamedly British, embracing London youth vernacular and ideology without attemtping to cast a sheen of glamour on every day life. If you like, they were Blur with decks and a washed out video colour palette.
1/5

Snap! – ‘Rhythm Is A Dancer’ (Song 7 of 12)

1 Nov

Two years in the making, this can be considered the ‘Yesterday’ of Snap!’s impressive career; a song that’s stood the test of time and been cherished by generations. Despite plenty of individuals tinkering with it, the original has still never been bettered.

Bolstered by an Iron Maiden chord progression and featuring the 90s metallic piano (at the 1:52 middle-eight), female vocals, rapping and a slamming wall-of-house sound, it was almost classical in its ambition and a welcome antidote to Nail’s despressing ode to self pity.
4/5

Jimmy Nail – ‘Ain’t No Doubt’ (Song 6 of 12)

1 Nov

There was a huge gap in the market during 1992 for woefully unattractive television actors that performed below average winebar music, a gap Jimmy Nail filled pretty effectively with this tale of not being loved by a lady despite actually being loved by a lady. The lady in question provides some vocals here, which Nail relentlessly interupts with his voice. Perhaps this is why no love is coming his way? Women like a man that can listen after all. This was recorded at Abbey Road Studios.
1/5

Erasure – ‘ABBA-esque’ EP (Song 5 of 12)

1 Nov

If you can’t decide what one song from a classic rock group to ruin, why not release four inept cover versions on the same EP? What could go wrong?
1/5

KWS – ‘Please Don’t Go’ / ‘Game Boy’ (Song 4 of 12)

1 Nov

There’s something strangely compelling about the mundanity of this solitary smash from KWS, a cover of a KC And The Sunshine Band single from 1979 which I believe goes down a storm in hotel lobbies these days.

What KWS should be commended for is their Ramones-esque attitude to music – take a genre or song, strip it to the very core of what makes it essential-listening, and then increase the speed. It’s just a damn shame that KWS didn’t have a Mosrite player. I couldn’t find ‘Game Boy’ anywhere online. Anywhere.
2/5

Right Said Fred – ‘Deeply Dippy’ (Song 3 of 12)

1 Nov

Their debut single ‘I’m Too Sexy’ went to the top in thirty countries, including the US, but not the UK because at the time Bryan Adams was in the midst of his 3-month stranglehold on the top of the charts. Right Said Fred are the only UK group since the Beatles to have a US number one with a debut single. That is pretty mind-blowing on so many levels. I’m not sure what this follow-up is supposed to mean but I wouldn’t be far off declaring it an ode to masturbating.
0/5

Shakespear’s Sister – ‘Stay’ (Song 2 of 12)

1 Nov

Miserable women making miserable music – what’s not to like? This song, for one, which is a dreary synth-pop ballad of nothingness. It’s no wonder that one of them checked into a psychiatric ward with severe depression.
2/5

Wet Wet Wet – ‘Goodnight Girl’ (Song 1 of 12)

1 Nov

Mercilessly short at 3:38, this clunker is still about two minutes too long. This is perhaps the most accurate band name in musical history – listen to Wet Wet Wet if the cleancut anthems of Cliff Richard get a tad too raucus for you.
1/5

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